A TEA TASTER'S GLOSSARY
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AROMA:

The odor of the tea liquor (and the infused leaf); also called nose Or fragrance. It may be lacking, faint, medium, full, expansive, and flowery. A complex aroma is often described as a bouquet. The character and quality of flavoury teas is partly. See FLAVOUR.

ASTRINGENCY: See Pungent.
BAKEY:

An undesirable flavor characteristic of black teas from which too much moisture has been driven off during firing. Not as strong as burnt.

BISCUITY:

A descriptive term sometimes applied to the pleasant aroma of well-fired Assam tea.

BITE: See PUNGENT.
BITTER:

An unpleasant acrid taste arising from several causes. See Green.

BLACK CURRANT:

The aroma and flavor of some fine Darjeeling's are sometimes described as reminiscent of black currants. See MUSCAT .

BODY:

The tactile sensation of weight and and substance of the liquor experienced in the mouth. The impression of viscosity is not due solely to the amount of soluble solids, but is accentuated by flavor and pungency. Body may be described as thin, medium full and so on. In black teas, full body denotes a strong, thick, concentrated infusion.

BRASSY:

Undesirable flavor tang in black teas caused by under withering.

BRIGHT:

Characteristic of all fine teas. Bright teas have liquors with a lively, limpid, or sparkling appearance. Usually an indication of good quality, as opposed to dull-looking liquors. Also, a taste description. See dull.

BRISK:

The opposite of flat. Related to but not merely a pungency quality, it is described as a ‘live' character found in the taste of good black teas. It is not related to age.

BURNT:

A smell and taste of burnt organic matter due to excessive firing temperature.

CHARACTER:

Loosely, the general quality of a tea. More specifically, the quality of aroma and flavor that can be associated with country, region, district, or even garden of origin.

CHOCOLATY:

A terms used to describe the flavor of certain fine Darjeelings, a slightly TOASTY flavor similar to that of some Keemuns.

CLEAN:

Usually, used to describe dry leaf free of dust, fibre, and stalk, but also often applied to thin, plain tea liquor of no other distinction that that of being free of undesirable taste characteristics.

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